WFIT

Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

U.S. officials say a 95-year-old former Nazi labor camp guard named Jakiw Palij who lied about his wartime work when he immigrated to the United States has been deported to Germany.

Palij, who lived in Queens in New York City, was investigated and denaturalized more than a decade ago. His deportation was ordered in 2004. But for years, no country would take him in.

On Monday, he was sent to Germany, according to the State Department. The Department of Justice says Palij is the 68th Nazi removed from the U.S.

Cascades of tears. Lingering hugs. Family photos. And questions that have burned unanswered for decades.

For the first time in three years, North and South Korea are holding family reunions, allowing a small number of South Koreans to travel across the fortified border to the North to reunite with loved ones they haven't seen since the 1950s.

Such reunions have been held intermittently since the '80s and have resumed as relations between the North and South are thawing.

Updated at 12:52 p.m. ET

Italian actress Asia Argento, one of the most prominent voices in the #MeToo movement, paid $380,000 to a man who accused her of sexually assaulting him when he was 17, according to a report by The New York Times based on legal documents anonymously leaked to the paper.

A federal judge has sentenced Esteban Santiago to life in prison for carrying out a 2017 shooting in a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., airport that killed five people and injured six others.

U.S. District Judge Beth Bloom called Santiago's attack "85 seconds of evil" when she announced the sentence Friday.

Santiago had accepted a plea bargain, admitting guilt on 11 charges in exchange for prosecutors declining to seek the death penalty.

Seven years ago, Florida Gov. Rick Scott killed a federally funded project to build a high-speed train between Tampa and Orlando.

Scott now supports the idea of a similar train route — fueled by private investment instead. And the governor and his wife have invested millions of dollars with a company that stands to profit off such a project, as first reported by the Miami Herald.

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