Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

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Leonard Bernstein burst upon the scene at the age of twenty-five as an emergency fill-in conductor for a New York Philharmonic performance. He would eventually be appointed music director of the Philharmonic, but not for another thirteen years.  So what was that all about? We'll take a look as the Bernstein Centennial celebration continues this week.

At one point in the 1940s, Leonard Bernstein became convinced that the future of American music was in the theater: that opera -- especially light opera -- was a close cousin to musical comedy, and that ballet scores, and even film scores, were more in keeping with our national tradition than the increasingly avant-garde music that was being written for the concert hall. We'll look at Bernstein onstage this week on Mozart's Attic as we continue to celebrate the centennial of his birth this month.

NPR

There's a great celebration in the musical world this month. August 25th is the hundred-year anniversary of the birth of Leonard Bernstein, a unique figure in 20th-century American music, not without controversy.  We begin the centennial celebration this Thursday  on Mozart's Attic with the first of a series of programs exploring the many facets of Lenny's career. Composer, conductor, teacher: we'll touch on all of these aspects before the month is over. 

Jean Sibelius
NPR

Jean Sibelius was Finland's hero-composer. They even put his picture on the currency. But after a seventh symphony in 1924, he called it quits, producing little more music for his remaining 33 years. We'll conclude our Sibelius cycle this week with this last of the series.

NPR

There's nothing quite like Florida in July, is there? Certainly William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream is nothing like Florida in July, and that's the point. We'll feature Felix Mendelssohn's incidental music for Shakespeare's comedy this week, and then we'll see what other cool stuff we can find in the Attic.

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