WFIT

Rick Glasby

Broadcast Journalist

Rick Glasby is a Broadcast Journalist at WFIT.  He reports on developments at the Kennedy Space Center, as well as volunteering during WFIT pledge drives.

Rick’s love of radio began at the campus radio station of a small engineering college in upstate New York.  Drafted for the Viet Nam war, he was fortunate to be sent in the opposite direction to host afternoon drive at “The Rock of East Africa” (an American Forces radio station in Asmara, Ethiopia).  He spent the following 10 years working in commercial radio in suburban New York, Fort Pierce, and Daytona Beach.

Rick transitioned to multimedia production (hey, the money was better than radio), and worked for companies in the Washington, DC area, creating interactive marketing and training programs for private sector and government clients.  Upon his return to Florida, he was thrilled to find listener-supported public radio WFIT (89.5 FM).  He had come home.

Ways to Connect

Orion Spacecraft
NASA

NASA has completed a technical review of the Orion program.  At a press conference this week, NASA confirmed continued support for the program, and provided a date for the first manned Orion mission.  WFIT's Rick Glasby filed this report.

 Blue Origin
Blue Origin

Jeff Bezos, CEO of space transportation company Blue Origin and Amazon.com, announced that Blue Origin has selected the Space Coast to launch his New Shepard space vehicles.  This is another big boost for the commercial space industry in Brevard.

Rick Glasby filed this report for WFIT:

NASA

Boeing has officially revealed the name for its CST-100 capsule that will ferry astronauts to and from the International Space Station under NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. The capsule, Starliner, will be built inside a former Space Shuttle Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center — which was officially unveiled Friday morning.

Rising Sea Levels

Aug 27, 2015
 UCLA's Laurence Smith deployed this autonomous drifter in a meltwater river on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet in July 2015 as part of an effort to understand the causes of sea level rise around the globe.
NASA / Jefferson Beck

Earth’s rising seas are some of most visible signs of our warming planet. Over the last 20 years, NASA satellites have shown a steady rise in global sea levels as the world’s polar ice sheets melt. As the Earth continues to warm, new research suggests sea levels could rise by as much as several feet.  WFIT’s Rick Glasby reports the big question is “when?”

NEEMO logo
NASA

Why are NASA astronauts living 60 feet below the surface of the Atlantic off the Florida Keys? It’s part of a NASA mission called NEEMO, for NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations. The underwater astronauts (or aquanauts) find the isolated depths of the Atlantic about as close as they can get to spaceflight here on Earth.

Pages