SpaceX

Victoria Girgis was leading a public outreach session at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz., when one of her guests noticed a string of lights moving high overhead.

"Occasionally, you'll see satellites, and they look kind of like shooting stars moving through the sky," Girgis says. "But this was a whole line of them all moving together."

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

The SpaceX Crew Dragon hit its splashdown time of 8:45 a.m. ET right on target Friday, landing in the Atlantic Ocean after undocking from the International Space Station and re-entering Earth's atmosphere.

The successful test and splashdown is "an amazing achievement in American history," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, who called the SpaceX flight the "dawning of a new era in American human space flight."

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

An Israeli spacecraft blasted off this evening, aiming to land on the moon. And if the mission is successful, it would make Israel the fourth country to land a spacecraft on the lunar surface – after the U.S., the former Soviet Union and China.

SpaceX, the pioneering space technology company led by Elon Musk, will lay off about 10 percent of its more than 6,000 employees.

The news was first reported by the Los Angeles Times.

In a statement, a company spokesman confirmed the layoff without specifying how many employees will be released.

NASA

The next rocket launch from Florida’s Space Coast is coming Tuesday morning.

SpaceX will be launching a GPS satellite for the Air Force on a brand-new Falcon 9 rocket. This is the first so-called “national security mission” for SpaceX. Previous launches have been conducted for NASA or non-military customers. Tuesday’s mission marks the culmination of years of political and legal maneuvering to break into the national security launch market. SpaceX bid over $82-million for the launch; 40% below what the Air Force had estimated the mission might cost.

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