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Sarah Hulett

Sarah Hulett became Michigan Radio's assistant news director in August 2011. For five years she was the station's Detroit reporter, and contributed to several reporting projects that won state and national awards.

Sarah considers Detroit to be a perfect laboratory for great radio stories, because of its energy, its struggles, and its unique place in America's industrial and cultural landscape.

Before coming to Michigan Radio, Sarah spent five years as state Capitol correspondent for Michigan Public Radio. She's a graduate of Michigan State University.

Contact Sarah Hulett at sarah@michiganradio.org.

  • Lansing, Mich., has been ripping out its lead water pipes for more than a decade and is now and has learned a few things. It's now sharing those tips with Flint.
  • How are great teachers created? Practice, practice, practice, says Deborah Ball, dean of the University of Michigan School of Education.
  • Flint, Mich., started drawing its tap water from a local river in April 2014. The water is so corrosive that it's causing lead to leach out of aging pipes, resulting in serious health issues.
  • Every month, a group in Detroit picks a church that could use an influx of parishioners to fill its pews — and collection baskets. Word spreads on Facebook, and come Sunday, the church is buzzing.
  • JPMorgan Chase will invest $100 million into the Motor City. The bulk of the money will go to small business development, blight removal and job training. Michigan Radio's Sarah Hulett reports.
  • Detroit's Belle Isle Aquarium is getting a little help from its friends in Washington, D.C. The National Aquarium closed late last year after more than 100 years. Thousands of dollars' worth of equipment went to the Motor City, where its own century-old aquarium is beautiful and historic — but starved for resources. Budget shortfalls forced its closure in 2005. But a scrappy team of volunteers has worked to open it to the public on a limited basis, and they hope the fake coral, fiberglass tank props, and other equipment from D.C. will help it regain some of its luster.
  • It became the largest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy. Its former mayor was sentenced to 28 years in prison. And a TV personality compared it to Chernobyl. But a new year is on the horizon, and for some parts of Detroit, things are looking up. Really.
  • When Detroit filed for bankruptcy protection last month, the people in Windsor, which is located directly across the Detroit River, took note. And while Detroit's economic troubles are far deeper than Windsor's, the two cities' economic fortunes are linked.
  • In Detroit, many business owners hope that filing for bankruptcy will help the city start fresh and ultimately become a thriving urban center mirroring other cities that recovered from near financial ruin.
  • Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder announced Friday that the state would be taking over Detroit's finances. But the intervention might not be enough to pull the city out of a $14 billion hole. It would be the largest municipal bankruptcy in the country, if it happens.
  • How does a post-industrial city manage property that no longer generates tax revenue but still needs the grass cut? One entrepreneur says he has a solution: He's buying up 1,500 empty city lots and planting thousands of trees. But where backers see a visionary proposal, critics see a land grab.
  • In Detroit, the predominantly black city and predominantly white suburbs have feuded for decades over finances and control of assets. A recent suburban vote to help a city institution offers hope for better cooperation. But old tensions are still roiling over a proposal to put a beloved city park under state oversight.