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Rick Glasby

Broadcast Journalist

Rick Glasby is a Broadcast Journalist at WFIT. 

Rick’s love of radio began at the campus radio station of a small engineering college in upstate New York.  Drafted for the Viet Nam war, he was fortunate to be sent in the opposite direction to host afternoon drive at “The Rock of East Africa” (an American Forces radio station in Asmara, Ethiopia).  He spent the following 10 years working in commercial radio in suburban New York, Fort Pierce, and Daytona Beach.

Rick transitioned to multimedia production (hey, the money was better than radio), and worked for companies in the Washington, DC area, creating interactive marketing and training programs for private sector and government clients.  Upon his return to Florida, he was thrilled to find listener-supported public radio WFIT (89.5 FM).  He had come home.

  • NASA has tentatively scheduled a launch of its mega moon rocket, the SLS, for early this Wednesday morning. A two hour launch window opens at 1:04AM on Wednesday, Nov 16th. Previously, teams scrubbed launch attempts in late Aug.
  • UPDATE: As Hurricane Ian moves toward Florida, the agency began to roll back its rocket and spacecraft at 11 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26, providing enough time for employees to prioritize safety of their families, as well as protect the Artemis I hardware before the hurricane makes landfall.
  • NASA is hoping to launch the SLS rocket on Sept 27th. This assumes the fuel leak has been fixed, and the Space Force grants a waiver on a termination system battery requirement. Without that waiver, the SLS rocket will have to be rolled back into the Vehicle Assembly Building, pushing the launch into October.
  • The Florida Department of Health in Brevard is now taking appointments for the new COVID booster shots. The bivalent vaccine is available for those who have had either Moderna or Pfizer shots in the past.
  • At a news conference onThursday, September 8th, NASA provided an update on the Artemis I mission. NASA is hoping to launch the SLS rocket on September 23rd or September 27th. This assumes the fuel leak has been fixed, and the Space Force grants a waiver on a termination system battery requirement. Without that waiver, the SLS rocket will have to be rolled back into the Vehicle Assembly Building, pushing the launch into October.Are you curious about what NASA hopes to achieve with Artemis I? In the video below, WFIT's Rick Glasby explains in layman's terms the goals and timetable for this historic mission.
  • A new attraction opened on June 15 at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Gateway: The Deep Space Launch Complex. It combines actual flight-flown artifacts with a motion theater simulating space travel.
  • The new Space Launch System rocket will undergo testing for a few months before launching an Orion spacecraft around the moon.
  • Update: The weather forecast has improved for this afternoon's launch of a weather satellite from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Only a 20% chance of unfavorable conditions. The two-hour launch window opens at 4:38PM Tuesday. Preparations are well underway for launching the next NOAA weather satellite from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. A two-hour launch window opens Tuesday, March 1st at 4:38PM. Weather is 60% favorable.
  • Brevard County ranks highest in median income for STEM professionals.
  • Melbourne Police and Florida Tech security fatally shot an armed student who reportedly assaulted students and then confronted police, injuring a Melbourne police officer, on Florida Tech's Melbourne campus, police said early Saturday morning.
  • NASA and SpaceX plan to launch the Dragon Crew capsule with four astronauts aboard tonight at 9:03 PM. The destination is the International Space Station, where the astronauts will spend the next six months.
  • Four astronauts will return from the International Space Station Monday evening. The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to splash down off the west coast of Florida. NASA postponed the return because of high winds in the splashdown zones. The delayed return pushes the launch of four astronauts from the Cape until this Wednesday evening.